“The Levitt Ring Model (1984, 1980) – a conceptual framework for understanding the attributes of low carbon innovations”

Posted on Posted in Low-carbon innovations

The Levitt ring model is a long established framework distinguishing between different types of product and service attributes. It is heavily used and cited in marketing literature. It distinguishes between core, primary attributes that meet consumers’ most basic needs, and non-core, secondary and tertiary attributes that offer consumers additional sources of added value. In her work on the appealing attributes of low carbon […]

How can diverse social sciences contribute to demand-side transformation?

Posted on Posted in Low-carbon innovations, News

Charlie Wilson travelled to Potsdam outside sunny Berlin for a symposium on how to achieve the 1.5°C climate target. The symposium brought together IPCC lead authors, scenario modelling experts, and policy stakeholders to identify integral elements of 1.5°C decarbonisation pathways and how climate policy ‘entry points’ can drive transformative change. Together with Felix Creutzig at […]

Meal kits: less C02…or more plastic pollution?

Posted on Posted in Future food, Useful Links

Meal kits are becoming ever more popular. Companies such as HelloFresh or Mindful Chef offer consumers easy to cook, freshly prepared food without the fuss of planning meals or going to the shops. Two articles, Heard et al. (2019) and Fenton (2017), investigate the carbon intensity of meal kits and find they produce less CO2 emissions compared to the same meal bought from supermarkets. This is because the pre-portioned ingredients of meal kits reduce domestic food waste. However, Gee et al. (2019) suggest that meal kits may actually increase emissions because they use significantly more […]

Environmental benefits of shared e-scooters brought into question

Posted on Posted in Future mobility, Useful Links

In cities across the world, dockless electric scooters are becoming an ever-more common sight.  These are often promoted as being an environmentally friendly way on travelling within a city, but this recent research paper by Joseph Hollingsworth and his colleagues finds that the truth behind these claims is more complicated.  When taking into account the materials and […]

Communicating about communication

Posted on Posted in Low-carbon innovations, News

Post written by Emilie Vrain Having spent the summer collecting and analysing data from an online survey about smart home technologies and social networks, one of our team members recently headed to Zurich, Switzerland to present some of her findings at the 4th European Conference in Social Networks. Emilie’s presentation highlights that current adopters of smart home […]

SILCI at the International Conference in Environmental Psychology

Posted on Posted in Low-carbon innovations

One of the SILCI team, Hazel Pettifor recently gave a talk at the International Conference in Environmental Psychology. The talk was entitled ‘The appealing attributes of low carbon innovations’. It focused on the opportunities to differentiate low carbon innovations from incumbent technologies by emphasising their valued public attributes. The talk drew on the teams work […]

World Social Marketing Conference

Posted on Posted in Events, Low-carbon innovations

Hazel Pettifor, Senior Researcher within the SILCI team presented her work on low carbon innovation attributes in a poster session at the World Social Marketing Conference in Edinburgh 5th/6th June 2019. A link to the poster can be found here. The conference brought together world renowned social marketing academics and practitioners including many working within […]