“Are really autonomous or self-driving vehicles just a fantasy?”

Posted on Posted in Low-carbon innovations, News

They are according to Simon Thompson, a principle researcher of artificial intelligence at BT Adastral Park. Hazel Pettifor attended The Tommy Flowers Institute Conference on the Future of Transport on 5th March 2019. This annual conference brings together academics, research institutions and industry practitioners with a common interest in innovation, this year it was the turn of the transport sector. A key take home from the conference came […]

Cultured meat – is it low carbon?

Posted on Posted in Future food, Useful Links

‘Cultured meat’ is an emerging technology in which animal muscle cells are produced through tissue culture in a controlled laboratory environment. According to the FAO, livestock rearing (particularly cattle) is responsible for nearly two thirds of the greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture. Cultured meat is regarded as a low carbon alternative way to produce meat if it can be manufactured on an industrial scale. However, researchers at the University of Oxford claim cultured meat could, […]

Norwich is named the UK’s first sharing city

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Norwich recently became the first city in the UK to join the Sharing City Alliance, which is a global network of cities which enables knowledge-sharing.  Together, the cities in the Sharing City Alliance can share experiences of the opportunities and challenges of the sharing economy.  The sharing economy challenges the model of private ownership, and promises to contribute to a more sustainable model of consumption through […]

You’ve got three minutes

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Written by Emilie Vrain Trying to captivate non-specialist audiences with research can sometimes been tricky for academics, having to avoid jargon and maintain interest. A competition was developed called the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) to encourage researchers to summarise and clarify the background of their research and present their findings in an intelligent and engaging […]

SILCI goes to Riga!

Posted on Posted in Future food, News, Useful Links

SILCI researcher Mark Wilson recently attended the SISA 3 (Systems Innovation towards Sustainable Agriculture) workshop, which was held in Riga and organised by the European Society for Rural Sociology. He presented a poster on how consumers can use digital innovations to reduce their food-related greenhouse gas emissions. The SILCI project is exploring end-user innovations which aim to reduce food waste, encourage dietary change, or support local food networks, all of which have the potential to […]

The important attributes of low carbon innovations

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SILCI researcher Hazel Pettifor recently presented the results from a major study to the Global Sustainability Institute (GSI) in Cambridge. In March 2018, the SILCI team ran a series of workshops with over 65 residents of Norwich. These focussed on gaining an understanding of the important attributes of low carbon innovations that appealed to potential consumers. This work is part of a wider program to explore the mechanisms that […]

Presentation on disruptive innovation and the 1.5oC target at the International Energy Agency

Posted on 1 CommentPosted in Low-carbon innovations, Resources

Charlie Wilson visited the International Energy Agency in Paris to present research on the potential contribution of disruptive consumer innovations to accelerated energy-system transformation in line with the 1.5oC climate target. This follows the recent IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5oC which had a dedicated (if short) section on disruptive innovation. Have a […]

Life on Mars

Posted on Posted in Future food, Topics, Useful Links

Fancy a slap-up meal on Mars!? Solar Foods has built a bioreactor which can make protein from CO2, water and electricity. The European Space Agency is interested enough to support Solar Foods in developing a bioreactor which could be used on flights to Mars, as well as on the red planet itself. This has a potential application here on Earth. […]