Understanding the role of cities in climate transformations

Posted on Posted in Events, Future homes

During the summer, SILCI PhD student Laurie Kerr participated in the two-week Bergen Summer Research School course “Cities in climate and energy transformations”.  This course explored the different roles cities and urban regions around the world can play in climate and energy transformations through a range of lectures, workshops, and discussions.  Laurie’s research is looking […]

Potential Climate Benefits of Digital Consumer Innovations

Posted on Posted in Low-carbon innovations, News, Resources

Do digital consumer innovations help reduce carbon emissions? The SILCI team scoured the literature for studies that quantified impacts on activity, energy, or emissions as a result of using digital consumer innovations. They focused on 33 innovations across mobility, food, homes and energy domains – ranging from shared ride-hailing apps and digital farmers’ markets to smart home technologies and ‘demand response’ (domestic appliances temporarily powering down when […]

Short food supply chains and Covid

Posted on Posted in Future food, Useful Links

One of the findings from Mark Wilson’s research is that consumers believe online farmers’ markets provide multiple public benefits, such as protecting the environment or supporting the local economy. With the onset of the pandemic, another co-benefit emerged…the resilience of short supply chains to an external shock. Food hubs using the Open Food Network platform experienced a 900% increase in demand, literally overnight. They fulfilled this demand by contacting the producers who normally supply the hospitality sector, which was now locked down, and […]

Presentation at the CEEDA symposium

Posted on Posted in Future food, Useful Links

SILCI researcher Mark Wilson gave a presentation at the CEEDA online symposium in June. The CEEDA symposium is an annual event where doctoral candidates from various universities present their research to an academic audience and receive critical feedback. Mark discussed the results of his questionnaire survey, focusing on the appeal of online food hubs and how adoption of the innovation could be scaled up in the future.   

Social Influence in the Adoption of Low-Carbon Consumer Innovations

Posted on Posted in Events, Low-carbon innovations

Post written by Emilie Vrain   Charlie Wilson and Emilie Vrain from the SILCI team recently presented at the virtual Sunbelt Conference hosted by the International Network for Social Network Analysis. The conference brought together researchers from a wide range of fields all studying the patterns of social interactions and structure. The SILCI team is interested in such social factors as they potentially play an important role for encouraging the adoption […]

Presentation at the Open Food Network community gathering

Posted on Posted in Future food, Useful Links

Mark Wilson presented results from his survey of online food hub users at this event, which was attended by people directly involved in the provision of sustainably produced food and building alternative food networks. His talk focused on two themes: i) the relative appeal of online food hubs, comparing the perceptions of users and non-users, and ii) how buying from food hubs fits within broader food shopping behaviours. More information about the event can be found here. 

Low-carbon innovations for managing the supply and use of energy in homes are likely to remain stuck in early-adopting market segments.

Posted on Posted in Low-carbon innovations, News

In a recent review we find that innovations that build on home solar PV generation (e.g., electricity generation and storage, peer to peer electricity trading, vehicle to grid systems) fail to adequately challenge the incumbent model of passively using energy in the home. Their appeal is limited to a reduced set of core and non-core attributes which offer added value […]

“Widening transitions”, and participation, at the virtual NEST conference

Posted on Posted in Events, Future mobility

Laurie Kerr, a SILCI PhD researcher, recently presented at the virtual “NEST” conference (Network of Early Career Researchers in Sustainability Transitions).  The theme of this year’s conference was “widening transitions”, and saw over 70 PhD and early-career researchers participate online.  Laurie presented some of her survey findings exploring the theme of “trust” in peer-to-peer mobility innovations.  Her slides can be found here. 

Electric vehicles – government targets company fleets

Posted on Posted in Low-carbon innovations, News

Hazel Pettifor a senior researcher with the SILCI team reflects on a new government incentive aimed at boosting electric vehicle adoption within company fleets.  From 2020 employees who opt for an EV through their company car scheme pay no benefit in kind (BIK) tax in 2020/21 and a reduced rate for two years following. The company car market remains a primary driver of new registrations for cars accounting for 8-9% of new vehicle registrations in 2018 (Department […]